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Saturday, August 18, 2012

Sound the Trumpet

Nope not the home, the vine . . .

IMG_1930There’s lots of these around here (vines not trumpets). Trumpet vine is also called Trumpet Creeper and is recognized by its showy  bright red blooms, which resemble a trumpet. The blossoms grow up to 3 inches during flowering time, here that’s usually June to September.

Trumpet vine is native to the southern US and was once valued for its climbing habit and large flowers but, having escaped cultivation, is now considered a widely-distributed, rampant weed. In warm weather, it puts out many aerial rootlets which latch onto any available surface to climb upward, and eventually expand into heavy woody stems. Here (and most other places) it grows on trees, telephone poles and fences.

IMG_1934If you have cows, don’t let them smell these flowers. It’s nickname is “cow itch vine”  as contact with the leaves can cause a rash in animals, especially cows.

trumpet vie collageIt’s also called “hummingbird vine”  and attracts Ruby-throated hummingbirds which easily reach the nectar inside the long flowers. The Trumpet vine depends on these birds to pollinate its flowers. Each time a hummingbird visits a flower, it gets pollen on its head, which it delivers to the next flower. Bees are also drawn to the nectar too, unfortunately, so are ants.

trumpet seed podsThe flowers are followed by large seed pods, 3 to 6 inches long, which when mature, dry and split releasing hundreds of thin, brown, paper-like seeds designed to travel by wind. Trumpet vines have become invasive as far north as New England.

Stop in at Sandra’s Madsnapper blog to see great Trumpet vine macro close-ups.  And, please keep Sandra in your thoughts, as this week, she posted that she’s suffering from vertigo and may require hospitalization. We hope you feel better soon, blogger friend.

LiveWriter-credit-360

13 comments:

A Quiet Corner said...

Good morning, Sweetheart! Seeing this while I sip my coffee is so great! I hope the one we planted grows and has such lovely blooms!!! ...:)JP

Maple Lane said...

I continue to keep Sandra in my prayers. Thanks for sharing these pretty photos. There is a wild trumpet vine across from the entrance to our subdivision and I have admired it from a distance. It's nice to see your close-ups.

Montanagirl said...

I have never seen Trumpet Vine. Beautiful flowers on them.

Ginnie said...

They may be considered weeds now but they are still lovely to see.

Country Gal said...

So very beautiful ! Have a good day !

Butterbean Row said...

How could anyone consider these beautiful vines with their flowers, invasive. Kudzu, now that is invasive. LOL

♥charlotte

Daisy said...

Your trumpet vine photos are so pretty, Beatrice. It's fun to watch hummingbirds visit these lovely flowers.

Elaine said...

Pretty flowers, but I can see how they could become a problem.

thecottagebythecranelakeolof1 said...

It may be an invasive weed but it is beautiful! Can't survive up here though, perhaps as a pot-plant and kept in a cool space during winter. Like it a lot!

Have a great day!
Christer.

Lois Evensen said...

Very nice. We have hummers and no cows so these vines work for us. :)

possum said...

I seldom cut them down, but soemtimes it has to be done. Personally, I love that bit of red up in the trees - kind of a surprise sometimes.

pembrokeshire lass said...

Isn't it funny that things that start off valued can easily take over and be a pest!? It certainly must look wonderful to see trees covered in it. Have a good Sunday. Joan

Anvilcloud said...

Looks nice. I am not familiar with it.

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